Ryder Lake toad update!

There were still Western toads migrating across Elk View, Ryder Lake, and Huston roads in Ryder Lake today.  The small toads spent the hottest part of the day hiding in vegetation lining the road but were found crossing the road in the cooler morning and evening hours.  The voluntary toad migration detour will be discontinued for tomorrow as well.  Please keep checking this website and the migration signs for any future changes.  Thanks for your cooperation!

 

 

Updates regarding voluntary toad migration detour

There are still many small Western toads migrating along Elk View road, however, there are currently more toads migrating across Huston road along the detour route.  Therefore we are discontinuing the voluntary toad migration detour at this time.  Please keep checking for updates and watching for the detour signs as we will continue to update the signs with changing toad conditions.  Thank you!

In other news, we have seen several Northern Red-legged frogs and Pacific Chorus frogs on the roads over the last few days.  Keep an eye out for these neat amphibians!

The heat isn’t stopping the migrating Western toads!

The young Western toads migrating across the roads in Ryder Lake have not been stopped by the high temperatures these past few days.  The majority of the toads are crossing in the cooler weather in the morning and evening but are still setting out across hot pavement.  The highest concentration of baby toads on Elk View is found near the intersection of Elk View and Ryder Lake roads as well as a few hundred meters south on Elk View.  Ryder Lake road also has a large contingent of these tiny organisms crossing from the wetland to their foraging habitat.  Please continue to take the voluntary detour route if possible.  There are still hundreds of toads on the roads in the morning and evening.

Tiny toads on the move… through culverts!

There are still large numbers of tiny Western toads migrating in Ryder Lake.  The baby toads are spreading out along Elk View and are still highly concentrated along Ryder Lake Road.  The toads moving during this migration have recently metamorphosed from tadpoles and some even have a remnant tail!  Check out how big they are in comparison to a dime!  In other news, a few of the toads seem to be migrating through a dry culvert on Elk View road.  Hopefully we will be able to learn from this behaviour to help divert more of the migrating toads off the road in the coming years.

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Many tiny toads were seen on the roads in Ryder Lake today!

The baby western toads were out in full force today scrambling across both Ryder Lake and Elk View roads.  The densest concentration of toads this morning were crossing Elk View road near the intersection with Ryder Lake road (near the mailboxes).  The migrating toads are very small –  only about the size of the eraser on the top of a pencil.  They look a lot like bits of gravel… until they move!   If possible, please take the posted voluntary detour route to avoid running over these endangered animals.  A map of the detour route can be seen below.

The toadlets are on the move!

Young Western toads have been spotted crossing Ryder Lake and Elk View roads today!  Please take the voluntary detour route if possible (see map below) especially between peak migration times of 6am – 11am and 5pm -10pm.  The toadlets are most likely to migrate during the morning and evening hours and fewer will be out during the hottest part of the day.  Thank you for giving these small toads the best chance possible to get safely across the road!

The annual toadlet migration is coming!

Western toad tadpoles have been developing well in their pond and will be moving out of the pond and across the roads in Ryder Lake later this month. This annual migration from the breeding pond (Hornby Lake) across the road to their forest habitat results in many toadlet deaths. The FVC is in the process of designing and installing an amphibian crossing structure to divert migrating toadlets under the road but this structure will not be installed until after the 2014 migration. We will continue to post updates about when we expect the toadlets on the roads through the coming weeks. If you are planning to drive in the Ryder Lake area during the migration please take the posted detour route, if possible, to limit the number of migrating toadlets that get run over. If you have any questions please contact the FVC at 604-625-0066 or projects@fraservalleyconservancy.ca.

This map shows the suggested driving route to limit the impacts of cars on this endangered population.

This map shows the suggested driving route to limit the impacts of cars on this endangered population.

RLAPP – Update May 2014

This season has been very interesting for the amphibians migrating in the Ryder Lake area! We have conducted 15 evening surveys for adult amphibians since March 6, 2014 and have seen many amphibians both dead and alive. Before May 15, 2014, 283 amphibians were found alive of which 92 were Western Toads and 90 were Red-legged Frogs. A total of 533 amphibians were found dead on the road of which 108 were Western Toads and 214 were Red-legged frogs. Overall, 35% of amphibians found along the survey route have been alive. The table below shows the numbers to date.

If you have any questions about this project please contact us at projects@fraservalleyconservancy.ca or 604-625-0066.

 

Species BC Status # Alive # Dead Total Proportion Alive Species composition
Northwestern Salamander Yellow List 10 12 22 45% 3%
Long-toed Salamander Yellow List 6 6 12 50% 1%
Western Toad Blue List 92 108 200 46% 25%
Pacific Chorus Frog Yellow List 80 148 228 35% 28%
Northern Red-legged Frog Blue List 90 214 304 30% 37%
Roughskin Newt Yellow List 5 29 34 15% 4%
Unidentified NA 0 16 16 0% 2%
TOTAL 283 533 816 35%
Total # cars passing surveyors 276